Women's Health

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Addressing Challenges In Bringing Male Contraceptives to Market

21 July 2022 10:00am EST There are currently more than a dozen categories of female birth control with proven efficacy on the market. Conversely, the only options available for men today are condoms and vasectomy, despite decades of research. No new male contraceptive products have entered the market since the condom was created in the...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Considerations for Clinical Studies in Contraception

Women today can choose from a wide range of effective and safe contraceptives based on their medical and lifestyle needs. Over the course of their lives, women may change contraceptive methods for a variety of reasons, such as concerns about side effects. For researchers, the objective of contraceptive development is to design products that offer...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Addressing the Challenges and Opportunities in Gynecologic Cancer Research

Gynecologic cancers continue to be a significant cause of female morbidities and mortality worldwide. Significant unmet needs exist in diagnosis and treatment. These cancers are often detected at later stages when therapeutic options are limited, and advanced or recurrent disease leads to a poor prognosis. Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments will enhance the quality...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

PM360 | New Developments in Gynecological Cancer Research

Substantial unmet needs exist in the diagnosis and treatment of gynecologic cancers. Often, these tumors are detected in later stages when treatment options are limited, and prognosis is poor. However, the gynecologic cancer space is on the cusp of change. The recent introduction of novel medicines, namely targeted therapies, has improved patient care and outcome....

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

The Role of Maintenance Therapy in Gynecologic Cancer Treatment

Advanced ovarian and endometrial carcinomas present the greatest challenge in treating gynecologic cancer and, among the five types of female cancers, are responsible for the most U.S. deaths annually.1 With a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation; patients can go into remission, but the majority will have a recurrence after several months or years. There...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Challenges and Opportunities in Gynecologic Cancer Research: Excerpts from a Round Table Discussion

Gynecologic cancers are comprised of five major types: ovarian, uterine, cervical, vaginal, and vulvar. All women are at risk for these, and risk increases with age. Specific risk factors include a family history, human papillomavirus (HPV) infections (cervical cancer), genetic mutations such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 (ovarian cancer or OC), and hormone replacement therapy. Early...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Improving Birth Control for All: Opportunities and Obstacles in Male Contraception

Introduction There are currently more than a dozen categories of female birth control with proven efficacy on the market. For men, the only options available today are condoms and vasectomy. Despite decades of research and discussion about male contraception, no new products have entered the market since the condom was created in the 1800s. As...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Considerations for Clinical Studies in Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is one of the most common gynecologic disorders among women of reproductive age, accounting for up to one-third of all gynecologic office visits.1 HMB refers to bleeding associated with regular ovulatory cycles and involves blood loss greater than 80 ml per month. It is a subcategory of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB),...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Addressing the Challenges and Opportunities in Gynecologic Cancer Research

Despite the impact on women’s health worldwide, significant unmet needs exist in the diagnosis and treatment of gynecologic cancers. Located in the female reproductive system, many have a reputation for being “silent,” as they are often detected in later stages when treatment options are limited. However, the recent introduction of novel medicines — targeted therapies...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Gaining Patient Input: How to Ensure Patient Interests Remain Top of Mind

Our focus on women’s health research means we’re sensitive to the concerns and needs of the female volunteers contemplating clinical trial participation. In order to effectively enroll women, it’s important to acknowledge these volunteers and consider their perspectives in every step of the clinical research process. Regularly engaging women, their physicians, and health advocates helps...