Safety/Pharmacovigilance

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

CAR T-cell Therapies: Safety Considerations and Toxicity Management

Immuno-gene therapeutics are transforming the therapeutic landscape of hematological malignancies. The recent approvals of two chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies—tisagenlecleucel (marketed as Kymriah™) and axicabtagene ciloleucel (marketed as Yescarta™)—mark the beginning of the next revolution in cancer treatment. However, along with demonstrated efficacy in hematologic malignancies, CAR T-cells have the capacity to elicit serious...

Consulting

6 Reasons Why Early Oncology Drug Trials Fail (And How to Avoid Them)

Unfortunately, not all oncology trials succeed. In fact, the phase success and likelihood of approval (LOA) rates for oncology are the lowest across major therapeutic areas. Although there are many reasons for these relatively poor success rates, issues determining dose, schedule, and regimen in early phase trials are among the most prominent. Why and Where...

Consulting

Six Dosing and Safety Considerations in the Era of Emerging Therapies

Sponsors of emerging hematologic therapies – including gene transfer and gene editing, adoptive cellular, and antibody-drug conjugates – face a unique set of challenges in conducting early-phase, dose-finding studies. Key considerations for developing early-phase trials that can more accurately define the recommended dose and identify adverse events for emerging therapies include: Using dose-finding trial designs...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Where Do We Start?: A Look at Dosing in Phase 1 Trials

Early oncology trials have changed for the better over the last few years thanks to novel investigational agents, innovations in trial design, and changes to regulatory practices. Among other improvements, these changes have helped to perfect the way study designers plan early phase dosing. Dosing strategies in Phase I trials First-in-human trials When an investigational agent is administered...

Consulting

Clinical Endpoint Committees: Ensuring the Quality, Validity, and Integrity of Clinical Trial Results

The use of Clinical Endpoint Committees for centralized adjudication of efficacy and/or safety endpoints can help to standardize outcomes and optimize the quality of clinical trial data, driving study success. Some compounds and many devices face the challenge of defining efficacy or safety endpoints so that they are scientifically measurable, objective, and valid. Often, clinical...

Data Management & Biostatistics

Endpoint Data Capture Strategy: 4 Questions for Sponsors

For a Clinical Endpoint Committee (CEC) to make important decisions, it needs the data to do so. That’s why developing an effective and reliable endpoint data capture strategy is a vital part of working with a CEC. Before starting a clinical trial, sponsors should be able to answer these questions. 1. What needs to be defined?...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

8 Steps to Jump-Starting a CEC

In our previous CECs blogpost, we reviewed why Clinical Endpoint Committees (CECs) are so crucial for successful trials today. But just how do sponsors establish and operate a CEC? It’s a complex process that can be broken down into these eight key steps: 1. Understand the deep level of commitment required in putting a CEC together....

Consulting

CECs: What Are They and Why Does Your Trial Need One?

Also called Endpoint Adjudication Committees, Clinical Endpoint Committees (CECs) are an increasingly common component of drug development and medical device evaluation. A CEC is a centralized decision-making body for safety and efficacy endpoints. The goal of a CEC is to standardize outcomes and optimize data quality, ultimately driving study success. A CEC addresses the challenge...

Clinical Research: Phase 1 - Phase 4

Top 5 Study Design Considerations for Acute Pain Management Trials

Short-duration acute pain management trials involve a variety of complex factors that must be taken into account for successfully evaluating the safety and efficacy of a new analgesic product. These five considerations are key. 1. Choosing the Right Model There are a number of established pain models for clinical research, each with its own type, intensity,...

Consulting

5 Endpoints for Rare Oncology Trials

In general, greater certainty about the clinical benefit of a drug correlates with an increased time to achieve needed results — the best evidence can take years of careful follow-up. But an unnecessarily long time to market isn’t good for sponsors and patients alike. This is especially true for patients battling rare cancers: With many of these conditions lacking standard treatments,...